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Anthropology and Ethnomusicology

Anthropology and Ethnomusicology

Anthropology is the study of human diversity around the world. In studying anthropology, you will learn how different societies live together and think about such topics as family, sex, religion, art, and economics and gain skills increasingly in demand in a globalized and automated world. Through classroom modules, optional placements, performance ensembles and your own anthropological fieldwork, you will also gain valuable skills in critical thinking, cross-cultural understanding, researching, interviewing, writing and presenting. Ethnomusicology (study of world musics) can be studied as part of Anthropology.

The Performance Room includes a variety of musical instruments from around the world, a collection that has grown since the 1970s when Ethnomusicology was first established as an International Centre at Queen’s by the late Professor John Blacking. These instruments, together with the sprung performance room floor, facilitate music and dance ensembles, enabling our unit to remain one of the leading departments in Ethnomusicology.

Anthropology at Queen's

Join Professor Dominic Bryan for his webinar on Anthropology at Queen's.

Subject Overview

The Performance Room includes a variety of musical instruments from around the world, a collection that has grown since the 1970s when Ethnomusicology was first established as an International Centre at Queen’s by the late Professor John Blacking. These instruments, together with the sprung performance room floor, facilitate music and dance ensembles, enabling our unit to remain one of the leading departments in Ethnomusicology.

2nd
In the UK
Guardian University Guide 2021

The fieldwork and dissertation have been central to my experience as an Anthropology student. While I am sure it will stand me in good stead in my future search for employment, its central value was as a practice which revealed what Anthropology is really about; through fieldwork, the abstract and theoretical concepts which we had absorbed in two years previous study became immediate and concrete; the subject came alive.

Samuel Ward (BA Anthropology)

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Anthropology Live Q&A

Join us live to chat with your future lecturers. 1 - 1.30pm

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